The First Nations Art Pavilion and The Gikinoo'amaadiwag Project.

The First Nations Art Pavilion will showcase a group of professional and aspiring Indigenous artists, who will also serve in a mentoring role for Indigenous youth artists. Additionally,  First Nations artists will share their cultural programming that will include storytelling, traditional craft demonstrations and workshops, singing, poetry.

The Future of Art - includes a prominent piece of Canada: First Nations people. The Gikinoo'amaadiwag Project, led my Jay Redbird, offers indigenous artists a way to share their work and mentor young artists in the creation and exhibition of their work. Gikinoo'amaadiwag means 'to teach each other'. We are excited to work collaboratively with First Nations artists!  At Artfest in 2018, we celebrate the future of all Canadian art and craft, creativity in children, theatre performance, music, poetry, good food and drink and so much more.

This project has been funded in partnership with Artfest and the Ontario Arts Council

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Artfest Welcomes Artists:

Jay Redbird, Halina Stoprya, Naomi Smith, Jay Soule, Trevor Owen, Mark Nadjiwan, Loretta Gould, Shiane Gould, Phil Jones, Don Jabokwoam, Angela Wemigwans and Sierra Lynn.

First Nations Craft Workshops - beside the pavilion

Traditional Deer Hide Medicine Bag 11am-12pm Daily

About Medicine Bags:
A medicine bag is an ancient item that spiritually represents the person who wears it. Medicine bags come in all manner of sizes, shapes and style. They generally are made of animal hide from deer, elk, moose or bison.  It’s a beneficial process for individuals to make their own medicine bag, since it is a personal item.
 
People carry a medicine bag for guidance, healing and protection. Medicine bags often contain objects from the natural world, such a stones, shell, wooden items, or medicines such as Sema (Tobacco). The objects in a medicine bag are meant to connect someone to their spiritual self. The special items in the medicine bag are said to create a positive energy, and that energy is the force that represents the person. So by creating a medicine bag and wearing it close to the heart a connection is formed with a person’s spiritual self.
 

About this workshop:
Location: ArtFest Kingston
Date: June 30- July 2, 2018
Learning outcome: Participants will learn how to construct a personal size medicine bag from soft buttery deer hide based on older style patterns of various Woodlands cultures of the Great Lakes Region. Deer hide lacing construction techniques will be explored. The completed piece can be worn around the neck. Traditional indigenous teaching will be part of the learning experience.
Time line: Each workshop session should be blocked into 1 hour increments.
Technique: Basic leather working with an emphasis on weaving and lacing methods.
 
Skill Level:  Beginner or all skills level. Family friendly.
 Kit fee: $10.00 Kit contents: leather lace, bag front and back pieces, large size glass beads

Woodlands Hair Pipe Bracelet 2pm-3pm Daily       

About the Hair Pipe Bracelet:
Adornment has always been important to Native people. Beads were used to display status, self-expression, community identity, and to commemorate events. There were also spiritual and medicinal aspects to wearing beads.
Wearing beads is a time honoured tradition for many First Nations people. It was a popular method for people to decorate themselves using beads in the form of threaded necklaces, bracelets, hair ornaments and other body embellishments. In the time prior to the contact with non-Natives, beads were fashioned from natural materials such as seeds, nuts, stones, shell, and animal bones.
One of the most popular styles of beads is the hair pipe. The origins of the name remain elusive but the style of the bead has remained in use from the early 1800s till modern times. The hair pipe bead is shaped into a long cylinder. This form allows for a variety of stringing methods and uses. Hair pipes were esteemed as beaded breastplates, collars and longer style necklaces. In the 1880s the woodland Native women enjoyed wearing them in single or multiple strand necklaces.

About this workshop:
Location: ArtFest Kingston
Date: June 30- July 2, 2018
Learning outcome: Participants will learn how to construct an authentic indigenous hair pipe bracelet using true materials and methods based on an older style pattern from the Woodlands cultures of the Great Lakes Region. Basic stringing methods and working with animal hide will be explored. The completed piece can be worn as a unique wearable piece of art. Traditional indigenous teaching will be part of the learning experience.
Time line: Each workshop session should be blocked into 1-hour increments.
Technique: Basic leather working and stringing methods.

Skill Level:  Beginner or all skills level. Family friendly.
Kit fee: $10.00 Kit contents: leather lace, large size glass beads, moose or deer hide pieces, sinew and bone hair pipe bead.       

Instructor: Naomi Smith • First Nations Artisan & Educator
416.275.5099 • blacktulipdesigns@yahoo.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Black-Tulip-Designs-162206290651372/

About the Artist and Educator:
Naomi is an Indigenous Artisan and Educator. She is actively involved in educating others about the ways of the First Nations people of the Woodlands and Northeastern area from a historical and contemporary perspective often through the story of beads. Her work embraces ancestral designs in the form of bags, adornment and traditional accessories. Naomi designs and creates Traditional Beadwork, Quill work, Leatherwork, Sweetgrass or Birch Bark basket-making, always valuing these Sacred materials through her teachings & creative process.

Artist’s Statement: “Honouring our traditions is my voice within and beyond my Culture and Community. Traditionally there is no word for “art” in Native languages yet artistry and visual expression are critical in defining who we are as First Nations people. It is this path I wish to exemplify through my teachings and my work."